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Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine

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Liaison psychiatry

Psychological Medicine focuses on the interface between medical and psychological disorders with projects focusing on aetiological mechanisms and on developing interventions that improve outcome and quality of life.

Our work is aimed at improving understanding of:

  • the epidemiology of both functional somatic syndromes (FSS),
  • the pathophysiology of FSS,
  • the role of psychosocial factors on treatment outcome and quality of life following surgery for cancer and trauma and in long-term cancer survivors and in developing effective and safe interventions to improve the quality of life in these patients.
  1. Overview
  2. Projects
  3. Staff

Psychological Medicine focuses on the interface between medical and psychological disorders.

The studies of the epidemiology of functional somatic syndromes showed a fashion change in the use of functional somatic syndromes (FSS) diagnostic labels in UK primary care. The particular labels chosen by GPs also influenced prognosis. Common risk factors preceded a diagnosis of any FSS, whereas uncommon risks determined the onset of different FSS. Studies of pathophysiology of FSS showed that both biological and psychosocial factors are important in these disorders. We are currently exploring the neurophysiology of pain in different FSS.

The main trial of our group has been the PACE trial (www.pacetrial.org), which showed that both graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behaviour therapy are safe and effective treatments of CFS. We are currently engaged in testing the efficacy and safety of guided self-managed GET for CFS.

Studies of cancer survivors suggested that quality of life is a problem for a significant minority, particularly related to fatigue, psychological distress and medical comorbidity. We are about to develop an intervention to improve the quality of life of cancer survivors.

Our current projects include:

Our national collaborators include the universities of Aberdeen, Bristol, Manchester, Oxford, and Imperial, Kings and University Colleges in London. Our international collaborators include the Centers for Disease Control, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, Duke Cancer Institute, North Carolina, USA, and Nijmegen University.

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